5 crisis management tips for freelancers

emergencyA few years ago, my wife Toni was working at a school that didn’t allow teachers to have mobile phones turned on during the workday. As a result, I was the one who got the call informing us that her father had died suddenly and unexpectedly.

I was juggling multiple projects at the time, one of which was on a tight deadline, but there was no question about what to do. I dropped everything immediately and made the half-hour drive to her school to break the news to her in person. The next day we were on the road to her hometown to support her family and attend the funeral.

Unforeseen crises like personal illness, accidents, natural disasters, and the deaths of friends and loved ones are a fact of life for any business owner, not just solopreneurs. And since our business model means we don’t get paid when we’re not working, even joyful events like births, marriages, holidays, and vacations can have a disruptive effect on our businesses.

Thankfully there are steps you can take to minimize the impact on your bottom line — before, during, and after a crisis:

1.    Build time for the unexpected into your schedule

Many freelancers and other business owners base time estimates on their peak productivity levels. For most of us, however, reality intervenes in some large or small way practically every day. Keeping a small amount of time each week unscheduled gives you the flexibility to put out minor fires before they turn into bigger problems.

2.    Schedule marketing in advance

Having a few weeks or months of material loaded into your marketing machine requires some prep work, but you’ll be glad you did it. My father-in-law’s death wasn’t the only time I’ve had to take an unscheduled leave of absence from my company, but my automated self-promotion pieces still published on schedule while I was away. Precautions like these help prevent your pipeline from drying up when you return to the office.

3.    Communicate when crisis strikes

Notify everyone who will be impacted by your absence as soon as possible, and be frank about what’s happening. Failing that, try to have a colleague, family member, or friend contact anyone you’re currently working with. It’s much better for you to give them as much time as possible to react to your situation than it is to disappear for a few days with no explanation until after the fact.

4.    Maintain a savings cushion

You’ve already heard this one if you saw Jim Krause’s presentation at HOW Design Live last year. Sock away 10% of your earnings to keep your business afloat — not just when crisis strikes, but to cover the occasional “famine” cycle. Six months’ expenses in the bank will help you sleep much easier at night.

5.    Remember: your real life comes first

It’s tempting to bend over backwards so your business goes on rolling in an emergency, but keep your priorities straight. I did a project launch call remotely a few days before the funeral, but only after I had confirmed I wouldn’t be needed for a short while that day. The rest of the time, I gave my full attention to my family’s needs.

All of my clients were very supportive and understanding during this time, and were quick to revise their timetables. Even my contacts at a company I had just started working with the previous week were sympathetic and accommodating. Good clients understand that this stuff happens to everyone — and could just as easily happen to them — so don’t be afraid to be straightforward about your situation.

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