Retronym revival

Taco FlavorSometimes words wear out. Those that fall out of fashion get labeled “archaic,” such as forsooth, rapscallion, or thee and thou. But other words get stuck in awkward places by change. People still want to use them, but they don’t quite mean what they did before. Enter the retronym.

Birth of a retronym

Retronyms appear when an existing word is no longer adequate to describe something. The word “analog” is a good example. No one wore an “analog watch” until digital watches came along. The miniature clock on your wrist was just a “watch.” The need to distinguish old from new also gave us analog recordings, analog signals, and analog circuits.

Here are a few more:

  • “Plain” M&M’s (now called “Milk Chocolate”) didn’t exist until 1954, when Peanut M&M’s were first introduced.
  • “Manual typewriters” were “typewriters” until electric ones were invented.
  • “British English” was just “English” until rambunctious colonists started throwing tea overboard and writing their own dictionaries.

Where retronyms come from

Changing technology creates many retronyms. “Acoustic” guitars. “Hard” copies. “Landline” — and later “flip” — phones. The term “broadcast television” was coined in response to cable and satellite television. More recently, e-commerce has given us the “brick-and-mortar” store.

But retronyms can also be used as a branding and marketing tool. One of the most famous examples is “Coca-Cola Classic,” used to re-introduce something close to the original formula after “New Coke” flopped.

Pepsi went one step further a few years ago, using “throwback” as a kind of retro-retronym. These alternate and vintage versions of their products — from soft drinks to chips — appeal both to nostalgia (“This is what it tasted like when we were kids!”) and the modern preference for real sugar over high fructose corn syrup.

Some marketers try to slap retronyms on competitors’ products when pitching new ideas. “Traditional,” “old-school,” “conventional,” and “legacy” are just a few words that can make the competition sound so last year. The same strategy can be reversed to make your own product sound cutting edge, as in “Web 2.0.”

The language it is a-changin’

From a writer’s perspective, retronyms highlight the reality that language is not a fixed or rigid thing. It’s constantly evolving to meet the needs of humanity. And while changes to structure and grammar are often slow and gradual, retronyms show how new words can appear literally overnight — transforming the way we speak, write, and even think.

And that can be a valuable tool to anyone who wants to change the conversation.

  Writer’s Block is a Myth

Writer's block is bad for pencils.You’ve heard the “writer’s block” story hundreds of times. Maybe you’ve even experienced it yourself. It usually goes something like this:

  1. Writer sits at desk to create amazing masterpiece.
  2. Nothing happens.
  3. Writer stares at a the wintery wasteland of a blank, white piece of paper/screen.
  4. Nothing happens.
  5. Agony/weeping/gnashing of teeth.
  6. Nothing happens.

There are few things more miserable for a writer than not knowing what words to put on a page, especially when there’s a deadline looming.

Yet despite its infamous reputation, “writer’s block” isn’t some wordsmith’s disorder that strikes without reason. In fact, it’s not what’s “causes” the block at all. It’s a symptom that appears when you haven’t done your pre-writing homework.

Writer’s block: fiction vs. reality

There’s a common misconception that writers just go into their lonely writer’s garrets, sit down, and start plopping words onto the page. This can work if you’re a fantasy novelist who practices “discovery writing,” but it’s a different story when it comes to marketing copy.

Writer’s block, then, is a sign that your brain needs you to do one or more of the following things before you hit the keyboard:

Listen to the client

What does your client want to communicate? If you’re working with someone who already has some marketing savvy, you’ll probably get a creative brief with background on the topic and some strategy guidelines. If not, you may need to ask the client for more details. Try to think like a member of the target audience when the client is filling you in. This will help you spot information the client may not have thought to provide because of their intimate familiarity with what they sell.

Identify the desired action

Every piece of marketing copy should focus on encouraging the reader to take one specific action. Download content. Request a consultation. Attend an event. Make a purchase. Make sure you know what it is before you write a single word.

Do research

Writer’s block sometimes strikes when you don’t know a key piece of information. For example, if you’re dealing with a very specialized or technical subject that you’re new to, you might need to learn about it before you can write about it. You’ll also want to learn as much as you can about the people you’re writing for. Who are your client’s buyers? What do they want and need? How do they talk? Do they think like your client, or do they have different motivations? The more you know about them, the more effectively you’ll be able to communicate your client’s message and encourage the action they want.

Focus

Another common cause of writer’s block is being overwhelmed with information. When this happens, your job is to get organized. First, figure out what you don’t need. Compare your material to the goals of the project, and set anything that isn’t relevant. Next, organize the remaining information in a logical order for the reader’s action journey. Stuff that attracts and excites their interest needs to appear first. Everything else should build on that, with each additional point of information guiding them one step closer to the desired action.

Low-tech solutions often work best here. I frequently tackle complicated projects by making 3×5 cards with summaries of all the key copy points. I spread them out on the table, move them around to find the most compelling flow of information, then gather them up into a stack and use them as my guide for the finished piece.

Outline

Still not sure where to begin? Try mapping things out in outline form. Once it makes sense there, you’ll literally have a roadmap that tells you exactly what to write. All you’ll need to do is add a little polish and detail.

If you’ve done the 3×5 card exercise described above, you’ve essentially built your outline already. Just pick up the stack and start at the top.

  What goes in a copy style guide?

A copy style guide doesn't need to be this complicated.Every set of brand standards should include a copy style guide to keep your writing team on track. Just as you define rules for how logos and other visual elements should be used, a style guide will help your writer(s) present your brand in the proper way.

A good copy style guide is especially useful if you’re working with multiple writers. It encourages a consistent “voice” that supports your brand strategy even if you have more work than one writer can handle.

But even if you only have one writer, it’s still a good idea to have clear standards. Freelancers and in-house writers who work on multiple brands will find it easier to stay on target. A guide helps maintain consistency over time, especially if there’s a lag between projects. Your guide will also make it simpler to bring new writers up to speed if you need to add or replace a team member.

Here are six tips for creating a great copy style guide:

Know your audience

Before you define anything else, create at least one audience persona that represents your target readers. Give this person a name, a photo, and a story that makes them seem real. If you have multiple audience segments, create a different persona for each one.

Define your style

The “voice” of your brand should complement its look by using a matching style and tone. If your logo is colorful and playful, you don’t want copy that’s stuffy and formal. A good voice should be distinctive enough that buyers will know it’s you even if they can’t see the logo. (Check out these five tips for creating an authentic voice.)

Show AND tell

Don’t just describe the type of writing you want. Back up your guidelines with specific samples. Most copy style guides include several examples of good writing that match the desired voice. Some guides also show copy that doesn’t fit the style, often followed by corrected versions. This “do this/not that” approach is especially useful when updating an existing copy strategy.

Document your quirks

Clearly spell out any style or grammar practices specific to your brand. One popular toy brand I’ve written for has a two-word name that can never be broken up by a line, column, or page break. Your writers will need to know how to deal with conflicts if your brand deviates from common grammar practices. (Should “eBay” or “iPhone” be capitalized at the beginning of a sentence?)

Depending on your brand, you might also list specific words to use (or not to use). This works best as part of a positioning strategy. For example, your brand may want to define everything it sells as “solutions” instead of “products,” or avoid terms that have strong associations with a competitor. Your guide probably isn’t the best place for SEO keyword lists, which need to be flexible enough to respond to changing market conditions and strategies.

Know your backup plan

Your guide can’t cover everything, and shouldn’t try. Instead, wrap up your playbook by designating a broader style guide as your go-to source for grammar and other style questions. Some of the most commonly used by marketing people include:

  • The Chicago Manual of Style. Published since 1906, Chicago is one of the most respected style guides used in the US. If you’re a professional editor or come from a publishing background this is probably your bible — and it’s almost as thick. It covers several different style formats and is great for squishing spiders too. Thankfully there’s also a searchable online version.
  • The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law (usually called the “AP Stylebook”) is designed for professional journalists. It includes guidelines for writing about major organizations and brands. You’ll also find useful comparisons of similar words, such as when to use “it’s” instead of “its”. AP is updated every year to stay current with changes to language, usage, and law.
  • The Business Style Handbook is specifically for people who write on the job (as opposed to journalists), based on surveys of communications executives at Fortune 500 companies. It was last revised in 2012 to add best practices for online communication.

Keep your copy style guide current

Market trends, customer needs, legislation, and even the language itself are all moving targets. Effective marketing teams review their copy style guides at least once a year, adjusting as needed to keep their messaging on target.

You’ll also want to update your guide any time your own brand objectives change. One of my clients recently realized most of their buyers were outside their target age demographic. Part of their response was to create a completely new style guide to shift their marketing focus.

  Managing Multiple Writers

Rubber ducks in a rowHaving a writing partner who knows your business inside and out can be a great marketing asset. But what if you have more work than one writer can handle? Working with multiple writers makes the process a bit trickier, but it’s easy to manage if you have the right process in place.

Make consistency your goal

While your audience may not realize it, they expect to have the same experience every time they read something you publish. For example, if you’re serious one day and cracking jokes the next, your prospects might get confused or question your credibility.

The primary challenge when working with multiple writers, therefore, is to make sure you still “sound like you” no matter which member of your team does the writing. In fact, it’s more important for your writers to be consistent than it is for them to be clever, witty, or even brilliant. You can try to standardize your approach by having conversations with your writers, but it’s much better to have your expectations documented in writing.

Build a playbook

One of the best ways to keep multiple writers on the same page, as it were, is to set up a style guide or “playbook” that spells out what you’re looking for.

I’ll talk about what goes into a writing style guide in more detail in an upcoming post, but at a glance it should include:

  • Guidelines for the voice and tone of your brand, including who you’re writing for
  • Examples of good writing in your desired style
  • Writing examples that don’t fit your style
  • Specific words to use (or not use)
  • Any style or grammar practices you care about
  • A default stylebook for anything you haven’t covered, such as the Chicago Manual of Style or the AP Stylebook

Be generous with feedback

A good writer will eventually have an instinctive idea for how your brand should sound. It might even seem like he or she is reading your mind. Until they reach that level, the more feedback you can provide the better.

One of the most effective ways to give constructive feedback to multiple writers is to refer to the playbook, and to be as specific as possible. For example, you might suggest keywords that could be added to the copy, or indicate where the tone could be altered to emphasize the needs of a particular market segment. Don’t just say “this is wrong.” Be as specific as possible about what isn’t right, where relevant guidelines can be found in the playbook, and what could be changed to improve it.

As you give feedback, be open to the suggestions your writers come back with, especially if they work outside your organization. They may provide insights that hadn’t occurred to you. If they make sense, consider changing the playbook to accommodate them. If you’re not ready to go that far, try an A/B test to see which approach gets the best response.

  Relevance still beats SEO

Analytics reveals the power of relevance!I recently started using Yoast SEO, one of the leading search engine optimization plug-ins for WordPress. I have to confess it’s making me a better writer. But it’s also validated something I’ve told clients for years: relevance matters more than anything else.

Many of you know that I think SEO has its limits. Still, clients and prospects keep asking about it. So lately I’ve been diving in and learning more about the art.

The proof is in the numbers

A month or two after I had a few super-optimized blogs posted, I did what every good marketing pro should do: I checked my analytics data. I was eager to see how the new posts were performing. To my surprise, my best-performing story since the beginning of the 2016 was something I wrote two and a half years ago.

In fact, nine out of ten of my top-viewed blogs in the last four months were pieces I had written before I started worrying about SEO. Some of them were written this year, but several dated back to the early days of my current website. Many were pieces I haven’t promoted or linked to in a while. And the SEO-optimized one? It ranked tenth on the list.

Relevance trumps everything

When I looked back over the top performers, I started to smile. They didn’t read like they were written for robots. There were no obvious focus keywords, no “optimized” subheads, and no dehumanized corporate-speak.

What they all had in common was relevance. Every one of them dealt with stuff my readers (mostly designers, writers, freelancers and other marketing professional) care deeply about. How to get better clients with less effort. Why it’s okay for you to outsource your own marketing. Five ways to stick to deadlines. And a personal favorite: 13 Traits of a Great Ghostwriter.

The top performers were also pieces I really enjoyed writing. They cover topics my readers and I are passionate about, use personal stories, and they speak in my most authentic voice. I firmly believe relevance, not SEO, is the secret of their success — especially the older ones that have been on my site for 2–3 years. And the numbers back me up.

Now I’m not suggesting you throw SEO out the window. In fact, the content you’re reading now makes every indicator in Yoast SEO light up green.

But I will continue to plant my flag in the sand and champion the cause of writing for humans instead of search engines. SEO can lead people to your content, but it can’t make them read it, like it, or pass it on to their friends. The most important part of the process is still knowing your reader. All the hits in the world won’t do you any good if visitors don’t find content they care about when they arrive.

  International Freelancing

international freelancingThanks to the Internet, international freelancing is easier than at any time in history. Here are a few tips to help your business reach across borders.

A world of opportunity

I never set out to become an international freelancer, but over the years I’ve attracted clients from many corners of the globe without ever leaving my office in Cincinnati. I’m currently serving clients in Canada, Spain, Italy, and Dubai. I work with partners in Great Britain, Eastern Europe, and India. Last month I even had a Skype call with a prospect in Sydney, Australia.

International freelancing can be exciting, challenging, and highly satisfying all at the same time. It offers new opportunities. It expands your horizons. It makes you feel like a connected global citizen. While it’s not without a few risks, it’s easier than you might think. And just about any creative pro can do it with a few simple tools.

You don’t have to know the language

Knowing more than one language is an advantage in international freelancing, but it isn’t necessary. Many clients come to me because they want copy written by a native English speaker. They know local partners will help them look and sound more natural while avoiding cross-cultural embarrassments.

Make sure you know who the client’s target market is, and how they prefer to communicate. For example, some of my international clients want American English (“the trunk is organized around the spare tire”), while others prefer British usage (“the boot is organised around the spare tyre”).

Managing communication

Inexpensive ways to communicate have been one of the biggest revolutions for international freelancing. While I still get the occasional long-distance phone call, most of my international clients are savvy about Skype, GoToMeeting, Google Hangouts and similar services.

When scheduling meetings, pay close attention to time zones. I’ve found the World Clock on my phone and iPad to be invaluable, especially when there are people in three or more places on a call. Be particularly respectful when someone has to dial in early or late in their workday. You’ll also want to take extra care in spring and fall when some countries have time changes. Not every country switches to Daylight Savings Time on the same weekend, and some don’t have a time change at all.

Finally, make an effort to be aware of cultural practices and holidays that may affect when international clients are available. In the Middle East, for example, the work week typically runs Sunday through Thursday.

Getting paid for international freelancing

There are numerous ways money moves between countries. I find the easiest way to handle international payments is via services like PayPal, Freshbooks, or Wave. You’ll pay a fee for these transfers, but they handle currency conversions for you and give you access to the funds quickly. If you have merchant services set up, they’ll also give your clients the convenience of paying with a credit card.

Checks in foreign currencies are a hassle, and you’ll pay a fee for the conversion that’s typically higher than what PayPal or a merchant service firm will charge. Direct bank transfers are another option, though some clients don’t want to go to the trouble. Once I even waited in line for a payment at a Western Union office, but I prefer to avoid that.

Make it clear up front what currency you’ll be working in. I quote most jobs in US dollars regardless of the client’s country of origin. Be particularly clear if multiple countries use a currency with similar names. For instance, despite occasional parity, US dollars and Canadian dollars usually have a very different value.

  How to write what you DON’T know

Question“Write what you know” is one of the most common bits of advice given to new writers, but it isn’t always the most useful. True, an inexpert writer can quickly lose an audience by saying something that strikes readers as ignorant or inaccurate. But what if you want — or need — to write about something you know nothing about?

There’s no question that personal contact or observation of something gives you an advantage when writing about it. That’s why many clients look for writers who specialize in a particular field or market. There are also some fields — such as science, finance and medicine — where a certain amount of technical expertise is practically a prerequisite — even if you’re writing for a lay audience.

Still, there are plenty of times when a professional writer has to start from scratch…

  • Sometimes the client can’t get (or doesn’t want to pay the higher fees of) an expert writer.
  • There are some things that no one living has directly witnessed, such as what was said between two generals after a historic battle.
  • You might be asked to write about a new product or other invention that is initially known and understood only by its creator.
  • Writing a story requires you to create characters who don’t exist, whether they live in a science fiction/fantasy world or are much like the folks next door.
  • And most common of all: you want to connect with and generate response from people who aren’t like you.

Here are three strategies that will help you sound like an expert quickly enough that you can still make your deadline.

1. Learn fast

If it’s possible to actually get the experience you need quickly, do it! For example, if you’re writing about a product, try using it. I was recently asked to join the creative team for a local pizza chain that had just opened a new store near my home. Guess what I had for dinner that night? Many clients are happy to help you learn more by providing samples, demonstrating a prototype, letting you shadow a professional for a day or two, and other “discovery” experiences vital to the pre-writing process.

If you’re working for a client, ask your contact plenty of questions. They may know useful information that didn’t end up in the creative brief, and may be able to explain concepts that don’t initially make sense to you. Many clients are also willing to put you in touch with subject matter expert or “SME” (pronounced just like the name of Captain Hook’s sidekick) to help you get up to speed on specialized information.

If that’s not enough, hit the web, the library or your own network of contacts to get additional insights. This will help you get the facts you need, as well as insights into how they’re interpreted. This kind of research is also critical when no one living has direct experience with something, such as how canals were built in ancient Egypt.

Pro tip: Make friends with a good reference librarian. You’ll be glad you did when you have to deal with tricky stuff that can’t be resolved with just a Google search.

2. Channel your passion

While it’s not impossible to write what you don’t know, doing it well does require extra work up front. A strong personal interest in the subject is a big asset when it’s time to buckle down.

I use this as my personal litmus test whenever I’m asked to write about something new. If I’m intrigued by a topic, I’m more likely to take it on so that I can learn more about it. If not, I try to recommend a colleague who’s a better fit for the project.

Passion can be a two-edged sword. As you make discoveries, be careful not to get carried away to the point you try to include every little detail you discover. Word count limits can be a big help here.

3. Get a reality check

Once you have a draft in hand, try to run it by someone who is closer to the topic than you are. For example, if you’re writing specialized copy, try to get feedback from a SME or other specialist.

This type of review is especially important when you’re “writing the other” — using the voice of someone who’s a different gender, ethnicity, culture and so on than yourself. Have one or more people who match the characteristics of your intended voice review the copy, and pay close attention to their feedback. This simple step can easily mean the difference between connecting with your audience or unintentionally turning them away.

  5 crisis management tips for freelancers

emergencyA few years ago, my wife Toni was working at a school that didn’t allow teachers to have mobile phones turned on during the workday. As a result, I was the one who got the call informing us that her father had died suddenly and unexpectedly.

I was juggling multiple projects at the time, one of which was on a tight deadline, but there was no question about what to do. I dropped everything immediately and made the half-hour drive to her school to break the news to her in person. The next day we were on the road to her hometown to support her family and attend the funeral.

Unforeseen crises like personal illness, accidents, natural disasters, and the deaths of friends and loved ones are a fact of life for any business owner, not just solopreneurs. And since our business model means we don’t get paid when we’re not working, even joyful events like births, marriages, holidays, and vacations can have a disruptive effect on our businesses.

Thankfully there are steps you can take to minimize the impact on your bottom line — before, during, and after a crisis:

1.    Build time for the unexpected into your schedule

Many freelancers and other business owners base time estimates on their peak productivity levels. For most of us, however, reality intervenes in some large or small way practically every day. Keeping a small amount of time each week unscheduled gives you the flexibility to put out minor fires before they turn into bigger problems.

2.    Schedule marketing in advance

Having a few weeks or months of material loaded into your marketing machine requires some prep work, but you’ll be glad you did it. My father-in-law’s death wasn’t the only time I’ve had to take an unscheduled leave of absence from my company, but my automated self-promotion pieces still published on schedule while I was away. Precautions like these help prevent your pipeline from drying up when you return to the office.

3.    Communicate when crisis strikes

Notify everyone who will be impacted by your absence as soon as possible, and be frank about what’s happening. Failing that, try to have a colleague, family member, or friend contact anyone you’re currently working with. It’s much better for you to give them as much time as possible to react to your situation than it is to disappear for a few days with no explanation until after the fact.

4.    Maintain a savings cushion

You’ve already heard this one if you saw Jim Krause’s presentation at HOW Design Live last year. Sock away 10% of your earnings to keep your business afloat — not just when crisis strikes, but to cover the occasional “famine” cycle. Six months’ expenses in the bank will help you sleep much easier at night.

5.    Remember: your real life comes first

It’s tempting to bend over backwards so your business goes on rolling in an emergency, but keep your priorities straight. I did a project launch call remotely a few days before the funeral, but only after I had confirmed I wouldn’t be needed for a short while that day. The rest of the time, I gave my full attention to my family’s needs.

All of my clients were very supportive and understanding during this time, and were quick to revise their timetables. Even my contacts at a company I had just started working with the previous week were sympathetic and accommodating. Good clients understand that this stuff happens to everyone — and could just as easily happen to them — so don’t be afraid to be straightforward about your situation.

  Is your copy trying to say too much?

blah-blah-goldfishLast year, a study by Microsoft concluded that the average human being now has a shorter attention span than a goldfish. Specifically, our ability to focus has dropped from 12 seconds in 2000 to just eight seconds.

At the same time, you have more stuff competing for your attention than ever before — especially on that smartphone in your pocket or purse.

A lot of marketing copy fails because it ignores these two realities, but yours doesn’t have to.

There’s a natural tendency among people who make great stuff or provide awesome services to tell you everything — and I do mean everything — about whatever it is they’re selling. This typically happens for two reasons:

  1. They’re passionate about their stuff (or at least about making money from it), and
  2. They don’t know their customers.

Either way, overly-wordy marketing tends to fall flat when it comes to selling stuff, not because buyers are fickle, but because they’re busy, distracted, and being bombarded by thousands of other sales messages every day. Your goal when reaching out to new customers isn’t to overload them with information, but to encourage action. Here’s how:

Know the prospect

While your copy doesn’t have to be short and “edgy” all the time, you have to grab the reader’s interest quickly and motivate them to take action in a clear, uncluttered way. The more you know about what they want and need, the easier you’ll be able to do that.

Do your customers want to cut costs? Are they status-conscious? Do you sell something they typically buy on impulse or are they likely to be comparing multiple sellers? A little research now can save you a lot of cost and anxiety, both today and tomorrow. And the longer you ramble on, the more in tune with your audience you’ll need to be.

Know what you want them to do

The goal of any marketing piece isn’t to check off a box on your to-do list, but to encourage a single, specific action from a potential buyer. This might include:

  • Visiting a website
  • Downloading a free report
  • Requesting a brochure
  • Signing up for a mailing list
  • Forwarding your message to a friend
  • Voting for a particular issue or candidate
  • Entering a contest
  • Attending an event
  • Connecting on social media
  • Visiting a brick-and-mortar store
  • Making a donation
  • Placing an order

Once you know what action you want the prospect to take, the marketing becomes much easier. Don’t write a word until you know what it is.

Make the “buying journey” effortless

Good marketing copy does just enough to whet the appetite. The goal isn’t to provide all the answers, but to encourage action by demonstrating that you can satisfy the reader’s needs or desires.

If a lot of information is important to the buying decision, provide it in two or more stages, using the first contact to qualify prospects. That way, when they request more details, you’re giving them something they’ve asked for rather than bombarding them with something that isn’t relevant to their needs.

At the same time, look for ways to make it easy for the buyer to move through the process. Don’t make them click twice if one click will move them closer to a sale. Do your job right and they’ll come to you — asking for all the stuff you wanted to tell them up front.

 

  Give your email a power nap

Automator napEmail makes a lot of things easier for the modern freelancer, but it can also be a powerful distraction. Just like a ringing telephone, the “you’ve got mail” sound exerts a powerful Pavlovian influence, suggesting that your latest message is urgent — even if it’s not.

Recent updates to the Macintosh operating system are helping me to ignore email more easily by displaying quick preview windows when new messages come it. I can tell at a glance whether it’s an important client message that needs immediate attention or the latest “last chance” offer from LinkedIn (hmm…third one this month).

Even so there are times when I need to hunker down and write without distractions, which means turning the email monster off entirely. But there’s always that little voice asking “what if something really important come in?”

My current solution is an email “power nap,” assisted by a simple Automator workflow. My custom Mail Nap application sits on my desktop, ready to spring into action at a double-click. This handy little app shuts my email down, then reopens my mail application exactly one hour later. If I’m done with my deadline, I can check mail in peace. If not, I can make sure there are no emergencies and fire up the nap application again for another hour of focused productivity.

I’ve been testing this little helper for about three weeks now, and so far it’s working pretty well. I’m getting more done during “nap time” without stressing about missing anything major. After all, I’m only offline for an hour.

Want to try it for yourself? Here’s the basic Automator workflow I’m using (sorry PC users—this only works on Macs, but you can probably find something similar if you poke around a bit). You can customize it for a different mail application or a different amount of time, but the basic ideas are all here. When you’ve finished setting it up, just save it as an application to your desktop or wherever else you like.

nap_workflow