Is your copy trying to say too much?

blah-blah-goldfishLast year, a study by Microsoft concluded that the average human being now has a shorter attention span than a goldfish. Specifically, our ability to focus has dropped from 12 seconds in 2000 to just eight seconds.

At the same time, you have more stuff competing for your attention than ever before — especially on that smartphone in your pocket or purse.

A lot of marketing copy fails because it ignores these two realities, but yours doesn’t have to.

There’s a natural tendency among people who make great stuff or provide awesome services to tell you everything — and I do mean everything — about whatever it is they’re selling. This typically happens for two reasons:

  1. They’re passionate about their stuff (or at least about making money from it), and
  2. They don’t know their customers.

Either way, overly-wordy marketing tends to fall flat when it comes to selling stuff, not because buyers are fickle, but because they’re busy, distracted, and being bombarded by thousands of other sales messages every day. Your goal when reaching out to new customers isn’t to overload them with information, but to encourage action. Here’s how:

Know the prospect

While your copy doesn’t have to be short and “edgy” all the time, you have to grab the reader’s interest quickly and motivate them to take action in a clear, uncluttered way. The more you know about what they want and need, the easier you’ll be able to do that.

Do your customers want to cut costs? Are they status-conscious? Do you sell something they typically buy on impulse or are they likely to be comparing multiple sellers? A little research now can save you a lot of cost and anxiety, both today and tomorrow. And the longer you ramble on, the more in tune with your audience you’ll need to be.

Know what you want them to do

The goal of any marketing piece isn’t to check off a box on your to-do list, but to encourage a single, specific action from a potential buyer. This might include:

  • Visiting a website
  • Downloading a free report
  • Requesting a brochure
  • Signing up for a mailing list
  • Forwarding your message to a friend
  • Voting for a particular issue or candidate
  • Entering a contest
  • Attending an event
  • Connecting on social media
  • Visiting a brick-and-mortar store
  • Making a donation
  • Placing an order

Once you know what action you want the prospect to take, the marketing becomes much easier. Don’t write a word until you know what it is.

Make the “buying journey” effortless

Good marketing copy does just enough to whet the appetite. The goal isn’t to provide all the answers, but to encourage action by demonstrating that you can satisfy the reader’s needs or desires.

If a lot of information is important to the buying decision, provide it in two or more stages, using the first contact to qualify prospects. That way, when they request more details, you’re giving them something they’ve asked for rather than bombarding them with something that isn’t relevant to their needs.

At the same time, look for ways to make it easy for the buyer to move through the process. Don’t make them click twice if one click will move them closer to a sale. Do your job right and they’ll come to you — asking for all the stuff you wanted to tell them up front.

 

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