Marketing Blueprints for LinkedIn profiles

Marketing MentorIlise Benun of Marketing Mentor has unveiled the second episode of her Marketing Blueprints series, featuring Excellent Examples of LinkedIn Profiles of Copywriters and Content Strategists. While I confess I got a nice ego boost from being one of the featured “blueprints,” I also learned a lot from what my colleagues are doing. Check out the video here.

Designers — There’s no reason for you to feel left out! Ilise recently created a similar video just for you: 6 Excellent Examples of LinkedIn Profiles of Designers.

  Does digital marketing really work?

dm-crystalDigital marketing — from content optimized for mobile devices to social media to predictive analytics — continues to spark passionate debates between skeptics and true believers. The key question, often asked by those who’ve been in the industry since before the Dotcom bust, is “Yeah, that’s kind of cool, but does is sell?

According to a new report released in July by Adobe, the answer appears to be “Yes, if…”.

The critical part is the “if.”

The report, titled “Four Advantages of a Planned Approach to Digital Maturity,” summarizes the results of Adobe’s 2015 Digital Marketing Survey, conducted in February of this year.

Some of the results will come as no surprise, notably that most organizations aren’t taking full advantage of the latest tech. Only about one in five companies surveyed (19%) have achieved what the report calls “digital maturity.” Such companies make specific, ongoing plans for digital marketing and back them up with investments in structures, people, processes, and technology. Nothing earth-shattering here.

Where the data starts to get exciting is when the report begins comparing this “mature” group to the rest of the pack. In particular, near the end of page 6, the authors rather casually drop this little bombshell:

In fact, when multiple departments are involved in testing, average conversion was shown to increase by 14%.

This isn’t one of the statistics that gets displayed in bold type, but it deserves to be. It’s the point where you start asking “whoa, how are they doing that?” (which is exactly what the authors intended).

I encourage you to check out the results for yourself, but here’s a quick rundown of how the report claims these organizations are creating digital marketing that gets results:

  • Investing in people, processes and tools
  • Keeping the customer first by adapting to their needs and behavior
  • Integrating mobile devices into every strategy they create
  • Using analytics to refine strategy and create a competitive edge
  • Looking ahead, not just reacting to industry leaders

This isn’t the first time strategies like these have shown up as recommendations for the digital marketing landscape, but they highlight realities that are slowly becoming clear to a small but growing number of organizations.

They also contrast sharply with what isn’t working…occasional instead of ongoing digital efforts, throwing stuff online without a plan, pursuing inconsistent strategies, spending time without investing resources, failing to measure results, and many other half-hearted practices that remain all too common.

Underlying all of the data is a reminder that digital marketing isn’t an instant-win game. It’s an ongoing process that increases in value over time. This remains a daunting thought for those who are just getting started, but the results are well worth the investment. Check out the report for yourself, especially if you’re a digital skeptic. The numbers don’t lie.

  5 Ways to Reuse, Reproduce, and Repurpose Content

recycled_copyMany of today’s most effective marketing strategies are driven heavily by content — the more useful and relevant to your audience, the better. That content requires time and effort to create, so it makes good sense to get the most from your investment. And since it’s unlikely most people are hanging on your every WordPress post, most of your readers won’t notice if you take full advantage of these “sustainable content” strategies:

Feed your blog or newsletter

Blogs and newsletters are notoriously hungry for content, and for falling behind schedule when the topic well runs dry. If you’ve taken the time to create a longer copy project like a white paper or ebook, look for excerpts that could stand alone in these shorter formats.

Feed the social media monster

Social media calls for smaller bits of eloquence, both because of character limits and shorter attention spans. Adapting longer copy for these formats requires a bit more editing than for a blog or newsletter, but it’s almost as easy. If your content is compelling enough, social media can simply be an entry point, teasing the reader with a headline that encourages them to click through to something you’ve posted outside the walled garden of FamousSocialMediaSite.com.

Create a book, eBook, or free download

The same tricks described above also work in reverse: a series of blogs or newsletters that share a common theme can be packaged together to create something bigger you can sell or give away. That’s exactly how I created my eBook The Writer/Designer Dream Team. There’s even a WordPress plug-in called Anthologize specifically designed to capture online content and publish it in print or common eBook formats.

Create a resource library

Even if it’s not the shiniest new thing on your website or blog, content you’ve created remains a valuable asset as long as it’s still beneficial to your clients and prospects. Once it’s had its time in the spotlight, keep it available in an easily-accessible archive. Your website is the best place to keep it around, because the combination of useful information and regular updates is one of the best ways to attract the Internet gremlins that determine search engine rankings.

It’s worthwhile to check in on your archive from time to time. Content that’s technical or tied to current events can become out of date, at which point it may be worthwhile to refresh it (generating new content for your pipeline) or remove it.

Publish on other platforms

A pre-existing “content mine” makes it easy for you to contribute to other websites and publications your buyers read. Some publishers are fine with re-using content in its original form, expanding your audience with a simple cut and paste. Others may ask you to expand or rework your content, either to create something unique or to make it more specific to their readers.

For example, I once wrote a blog for a publisher’s website, something I do at least once a month to build credibility and reach a wider audience. The post caught the attention of a magazine owned by the same company, which paid me to expand it into a longer print article. About six months later I received another check when the article was re-published in two of the company’s anthologies.

Final thoughts

The primary goal of publishing regular content is to increase your visibility, so your options for when and where you reuse it are pretty flexible. Some publishers prefer to let a little time go by before re-publishing content somewhere else, others like to post segments of the same content in multiple channels simultaneously to attract a wider audience. Either strategy is enhanced by an archive that automatically collects older content when it’s replaced by something new.

While all of these strategies offer effective ways to attract new buyers, relevance is still the king. If your content addresses the wants and needs of your readers, any combination of these strategies can be successful. If it doesn’t, none of them will work.