Christ Hospital Advertorials

The Christ Hospital Health Network is a leading medical institution in a region that boasts several world-class players. Though more than 125 years old, the organization continually strives to be more than just a hospital while reimagining what healthcare can be.

Regular sponsored content in The Cincinnati Enquirer and its website, cincinnati.com, is a key part of the group’s marketing strategy.WordStreamCopy’s role is to make these stories compelling and accessible to ordinary people.

To that end we interview patients and physicians to find inspiring personal stories. This soft approach gives a human face to the network’s contributions to research, treatment and technology. Other pieces suggest ways readers can improve their own health, or assist research that could make a difference in the lives of others.

Click the images below to see samples from the series.

Note: Tom only writes the main story for these features. Sidebars are provided by the client.

GRAIL Cancer Research Advertorial

GRAIL Cancer Research

Watchman Device Advertorial

Watchman Device

Flu Advertorial

Flu Advice

  Retronym revival

Taco FlavorSometimes words wear out. Those that fall out of fashion get labeled “archaic,” such as forsooth, rapscallion, or thee and thou. But other words get stuck in awkward places by change. People still want to use them, but they don’t quite mean what they did before. Enter the retronym.

Birth of a retronym

Retronyms appear when an existing word is no longer adequate to describe something. The word “analog” is a good example. No one wore an “analog watch” until digital watches came along. The miniature clock on your wrist was just a “watch.” The need to distinguish old from new also gave us analog recordings, analog signals, and analog circuits.

Here are a few more:

  • “Plain” M&M’s (now called “Milk Chocolate”) didn’t exist until 1954, when Peanut M&M’s were first introduced.
  • “Manual typewriters” were “typewriters” until electric ones were invented.
  • “British English” was just “English” until rambunctious colonists started throwing tea overboard and writing their own dictionaries.

Where retronyms come from

Changing technology creates many retronyms. “Acoustic” guitars. “Hard” copies. “Landline” — and later “flip” — phones. The term “broadcast television” was coined in response to cable and satellite television. More recently, e-commerce has given us the “brick-and-mortar” store.

But retronyms can also be used as a branding and marketing tool. One of the most famous examples is “Coca-Cola Classic,” used to re-introduce something close to the original formula after “New Coke” flopped.

Pepsi went one step further a few years ago, using “throwback” as a kind of retro-retronym. These alternate and vintage versions of their products — from soft drinks to chips — appeal both to nostalgia (“This is what it tasted like when we were kids!”) and the modern preference for real sugar over high fructose corn syrup.

Some marketers try to slap retronyms on competitors’ products when pitching new ideas. “Traditional,” “old-school,” “conventional,” and “legacy” are just a few words that can make the competition sound so last year. The same strategy can be reversed to make your own product sound cutting edge, as in “Web 2.0.”

The language it is a-changin’

From a writer’s perspective, retronyms highlight the reality that language is not a fixed or rigid thing. It’s constantly evolving to meet the needs of humanity. And while changes to structure and grammar are often slow and gradual, retronyms show how new words can appear literally overnight — transforming the way we speak, write, and even think.

And that can be a valuable tool to anyone who wants to change the conversation.

  How to write what you DON’T know

Question“Write what you know” is one of the most common bits of advice given to new writers, but it isn’t always the most useful. True, an inexpert writer can quickly lose an audience by saying something that strikes readers as ignorant or inaccurate. But what if you want — or need — to write about something you know nothing about?

There’s no question that personal contact or observation of something gives you an advantage when writing about it. That’s why many clients look for writers who specialize in a particular field or market. There are also some fields — such as science, finance and medicine — where a certain amount of technical expertise is practically a prerequisite — even if you’re writing for a lay audience.

Still, there are plenty of times when a professional writer has to start from scratch…

  • Sometimes the client can’t get (or doesn’t want to pay the higher fees of) an expert writer.
  • There are some things that no one living has directly witnessed, such as what was said between two generals after a historic battle.
  • You might be asked to write about a new product or other invention that is initially known and understood only by its creator.
  • Writing a story requires you to create characters who don’t exist, whether they live in a science fiction/fantasy world or are much like the folks next door.
  • And most common of all: you want to connect with and generate response from people who aren’t like you.

Here are three strategies that will help you sound like an expert quickly enough that you can still make your deadline.

1. Learn fast

If it’s possible to actually get the experience you need quickly, do it! For example, if you’re writing about a product, try using it. I was recently asked to join the creative team for a local pizza chain that had just opened a new store near my home. Guess what I had for dinner that night? Many clients are happy to help you learn more by providing samples, demonstrating a prototype, letting you shadow a professional for a day or two, and other “discovery” experiences vital to the pre-writing process.

If you’re working for a client, ask your contact plenty of questions. They may know useful information that didn’t end up in the creative brief, and may be able to explain concepts that don’t initially make sense to you. Many clients are also willing to put you in touch with subject matter expert or “SME” (pronounced just like the name of Captain Hook’s sidekick) to help you get up to speed on specialized information.

If that’s not enough, hit the web, the library or your own network of contacts to get additional insights. This will help you get the facts you need, as well as insights into how they’re interpreted. This kind of research is also critical when no one living has direct experience with something, such as how canals were built in ancient Egypt.

Pro tip: Make friends with a good reference librarian. You’ll be glad you did when you have to deal with tricky stuff that can’t be resolved with just a Google search.

2. Channel your passion

While it’s not impossible to write what you don’t know, doing it well does require extra work up front. A strong personal interest in the subject is a big asset when it’s time to buckle down.

I use this as my personal litmus test whenever I’m asked to write about something new. If I’m intrigued by a topic, I’m more likely to take it on so that I can learn more about it. If not, I try to recommend a colleague who’s a better fit for the project.

Passion can be a two-edged sword. As you make discoveries, be careful not to get carried away to the point you try to include every little detail you discover. Word count limits can be a big help here.

3. Get a reality check

Once you have a draft in hand, try to run it by someone who is closer to the topic than you are. For example, if you’re writing specialized copy, try to get feedback from a SME or other specialist.

This type of review is especially important when you’re “writing the other” — using the voice of someone who’s a different gender, ethnicity, culture and so on than yourself. Have one or more people who match the characteristics of your intended voice review the copy, and pay close attention to their feedback. This simple step can easily mean the difference between connecting with your audience or unintentionally turning them away.

  Does digital marketing really work?

dm-crystalDigital marketing — from content optimized for mobile devices to social media to predictive analytics — continues to spark passionate debates between skeptics and true believers. The key question, often asked by those who’ve been in the industry since before the Dotcom bust, is “Yeah, that’s kind of cool, but does is sell?

According to a new report released in July by Adobe, the answer appears to be “Yes, if…”.

The critical part is the “if.”

The report, titled “Four Advantages of a Planned Approach to Digital Maturity,” summarizes the results of Adobe’s 2015 Digital Marketing Survey, conducted in February of this year.

Some of the results will come as no surprise, notably that most organizations aren’t taking full advantage of the latest tech. Only about one in five companies surveyed (19%) have achieved what the report calls “digital maturity.” Such companies make specific, ongoing plans for digital marketing and back them up with investments in structures, people, processes, and technology. Nothing earth-shattering here.

Where the data starts to get exciting is when the report begins comparing this “mature” group to the rest of the pack. In particular, near the end of page 6, the authors rather casually drop this little bombshell:

In fact, when multiple departments are involved in testing, average conversion was shown to increase by 14%.

This isn’t one of the statistics that gets displayed in bold type, but it deserves to be. It’s the point where you start asking “whoa, how are they doing that?” (which is exactly what the authors intended).

I encourage you to check out the results for yourself, but here’s a quick rundown of how the report claims these organizations are creating digital marketing that gets results:

  • Investing in people, processes and tools
  • Keeping the customer first by adapting to their needs and behavior
  • Integrating mobile devices into every strategy they create
  • Using analytics to refine strategy and create a competitive edge
  • Looking ahead, not just reacting to industry leaders

This isn’t the first time strategies like these have shown up as recommendations for the digital marketing landscape, but they highlight realities that are slowly becoming clear to a small but growing number of organizations.

They also contrast sharply with what isn’t working…occasional instead of ongoing digital efforts, throwing stuff online without a plan, pursuing inconsistent strategies, spending time without investing resources, failing to measure results, and many other half-hearted practices that remain all too common.

Underlying all of the data is a reminder that digital marketing isn’t an instant-win game. It’s an ongoing process that increases in value over time. This remains a daunting thought for those who are just getting started, but the results are well worth the investment. Check out the report for yourself, especially if you’re a digital skeptic. The numbers don’t lie.

  5 ways WordPress is changing my business

dashboard-menuEarlier this year, I mentioned WordPress as one of three major software tools every writer should know how to use. I don’t often encourage writers to delve too deeply into this sort of thing, but the more you learn about WordPress, the more you can benefit from advantages like these:

1. Simultaneous workflow

Knowing your way around WordPress makes it a lot easier for the writer and the design team to do their jobs at the same time. The whole “chicken and egg” debate is less of an issue, because the writer can respond in real-time to what the design team is doing and vice versa.

2. Improved accuracy

When I first started writing Web copy, I would send the design team a Word file, which they would then have to load into the site. Most of the time this wasn’t a problem, but I always had to check the results to make sure that formatting like subheads, bold type, or italics didn’t accidentally get lost in the translation. Sometimes entire paragraphs would disappear.

Posting your copy directly into WordPress eliminates one of the steps where ordinary human errors can occur. It’s especially helpful to the design team — and to you — if everyone agrees ahead of time about how style sheets and other structural elements should be handled.

3. Faster editing

This is an extension of the first two benefits that happens after the initial draft is submitted. If you can make editing changes yourself, you don’t have to wait for someone on the design team to do it, and you don’t have to worry about any of your changes being accidentally skipped or misinterpreted. This faster integration helps jobs get done sooner, which means everyone gets paid faster.

4. Happy design partners

Notice a recurring theme in these benefits? Everything we’ve mentioned so far makes things easier for the design team — which makes them very, very happy. This frequently leads to…

5. More Web copy gigs

Once you’ve earned the trust of a design team by demonstrating your WordPress prowess, you’ll find that they’re eager to keep you involved with regular updates to the projects you’ve collaborated on. And by enabling them to spend more of their time focused on the design work they love while you handle that pesky copy, you’ll also be more likely to get the call when new gigs come up.

  User manual for technical copy

greengearsMany people I work with have a regular need for technical copy. The industries are as varied as alternative energy, medicine, green construction and IT, but the basic need is always the same: helping bright, inventive people tell their stories without making the reader’s eyes glaze over.

The genie’s out of the bottle, but who’s rubbing the lamp?
Promoting innovative new technologies can be a challenging balancing act, but it basically boils down to two things:

  1. Knowing what your whiz-bang wonder is good for. (Note that this is different from knowing what it does or how it works.)
  2. Knowing your audience.

I like to identify the audience first, but this doesn’t always work with tech because innovation doesn’t like to travel in straight lines. The history of science is filled with stories of clever people who accidentally created a breakthrough product while they were working on something else. Penicillin, Post-it notes, Viagra, Silly Putty, Coca-Cola, chocolate chip cookies, and even the color mauve all share the legacy of being discovered or invented “by mistake.” When this happens, your audience might not be who you originally expected it to be.

New isn’t enough
While there are always early adopters who crave the latest gizmo, there are many more who view new technology with skepticism and dread. Even those who are interested can feel a conflicting pull between the desire to be up to date and the fear of riding the wrong wave of the future.

The key to overcoming these concerns is to be a problem solver. Identify the challenges your technology will ease or eliminate. Will it save time or costs? Reduce the risk of injury? Improve quality? Ensure compliance with regulations?

“Why now” beats “how it works” every time
A critical part of your discovery process will be comparing the costs of using the new technology versus continuing with the status quo. How quickly will users to recoup their costs? If it’s going to take a while, you may need to consider other incentives to encourage buyers to act now. For example, many residential solar companies use a lease-financing payment plan to give their customers immediate cost savings compared to their current electric rates.

The many-headed hydra
If you’re only selling to one group, consider yourself lucky. Tech marketing often creates the need to communicate with people who have different levels of expertise. For example, the engineers who actually use a new software system will want more technical details than the CEO who makes the buying decision. You may also have to consider the needs of journalists and potential investors. When possible, try to direct different marketing efforts with appropriate “geek levels” toward each segment of your audience.

Remember: readers aren’t robots
In the discovery phase, it often takes fifteen minutes or more for brilliant technomancers to explain the significance of their creations. The inevitable PowerPoint accompaniment sometimes helps. Sometimes. (To be fair, this usually isn’t PowerPoint’s fault. For tips on how to cheat “Death by PowerPoint,” check out my colleague Laura Foley.)

Drawn-out explanations like this won’t work outside the lab, so distill the message as much as you can. If you can describe what it does and what it’s good for in ten words or less, you’ll have a major competitive advantage.

  Should your writer be a specialist?

Expert-iconWhen I studied journalism in college, I spent less time than you might expect learning the craft of writing itself. That’s not to say the training wasn’t rigorous. Professors in the department were known for handing out automatic “F” grades if a person’s name was misspelled. One was even nicknamed “Conan the Grammarian.” And there was zero tolerance for late homework to drive home the lesson that deadlines matter.

What I always found most interesting, however, was the amount of time I was required to spend outside the journalism department.

Two significant segments of the program were elective-driven. The first was designed to give students a general background in a variety of disciplines, such as political science, economics, psychology, sociology, and history. We also had to complete one or two concentrated areas of specialization, which could be just about anything we chose.

Our advisors and instructors regularly reinforced the message implied by this structure: writing skills aren’t enough. Successful writers typically come to the table with something more, and when it comes to finding work, there are better opportunities for those who choose to go narrow rather than wide.

From a client’s perspective this means you may need to do a bit of homework to find the writer who best fits your project. Writers are a diverse lot whose backgrounds and interests shape the topics they know well and the type of work they seek out. Some are generalists who crave variety and take on a wide range of projects. Others are focused on a specific vertical market, type of work, or area of expertise.

So which type of writer is best for you?

The Generalist

Generalists are typically people who begin their careers with an interest in writing. They often have degrees in journalism, English, or marketing. Generalists are great if you have a lot of production work, a project that crosses multiple disciplines, or want the kind of fresh perspective that an untrained outsider can bring to your business.

A good generalist has the ability to grasp new concepts quickly and identify where your expertise overlaps the needs and desires of your audience. Even if your product or service relies on complex expertise, a generalist can be a great asset to your team if your target market doesn’t share the same background.

In many cases a generalist will have lower rates, though this may not mean they’ll be the least expensive option. And while there are plenty of exceptions, a fair number of generalists are still in the early stages of their writing careers, taking on whatever types of work they can find to fill the pipeline.

There are many diamonds in the rough to be found among generalists, especially those who come to you by referral. If your product or service requires specialized knowledge, however, it may require more time, effort, and cost to work with one.

The Specialist

Many specialist writers are former generalists who have chosen to focus on one or more areas of expertise. This can be the result of personal interest or chance. I’ve done both: I specialize in technology because I find it compelling, and in finance because I happened to pick up a lot of financial gigs early in my career.

Another type of specialist is the expert who has branched out into writing. One of the most successful copywriters I know is a former chemical engineer. He’s built a thriving career writing technical white papers and taking a scientific approach to marketing.

Like any high-quality product, a specialist is going to cost a little more—but it’s often worth it.

To begin with, a specialist is often a better value because you don’t have as much training to do. This is particularly valuable if you work in a field like healthcare, technology, or finance where critical concepts can’t always be explained in one or two phone calls. If you’re also marketing to expert readers, you may need a specialist out of the gate.

A good specialist stays up to date on current trends in your industry, and may bring expert insights that can enhance your project. The longer a specialist has focused on your field, the greater this perspective is likely to be.

The Best of Both Worlds

A great specialist gives you the best of the generalist’s skill set too: bringing a solid foundation in expert knowledge to the table without loosing touch with humanity. A writer like this is worth paying a little extra for, because you’ll make your investment back in saved time and superior response from your buyers.

Whichever option you choose, your writer should be able to communicate in language that generates response from your target audience—which may or may not be your preferred strain of gobbledygook.

  NLign Analytics website

NLign-iconNLign needed to explain a highly-technical product to multiple audiences with different levels of technical expertise. The solution was to create a website of nested layers: a home page primarily in layman’s terms for journalists and potential investors, more detailed landing pages aimed at C-level readers in targeted vertical industries, down to a core of geek-savvy case studies for the engineers who influence buying decisions.