5 Ways to Reuse, Reproduce, and Repurpose Content

recycled_copyMany of today’s most effective marketing strategies are driven heavily by content — the more useful and relevant to your audience, the better. That content requires time and effort to create, so it makes good sense to get the most from your investment. And since it’s unlikely most people are hanging on your every WordPress post, most of your readers won’t notice if you take full advantage of these “sustainable content” strategies:

Feed your blog or newsletter

Blogs and newsletters are notoriously hungry for content, and for falling behind schedule when the topic well runs dry. If you’ve taken the time to create a longer copy project like a white paper or ebook, look for excerpts that could stand alone in these shorter formats.

Feed the social media monster

Social media calls for smaller bits of eloquence, both because of character limits and shorter attention spans. Adapting longer copy for these formats requires a bit more editing than for a blog or newsletter, but it’s almost as easy. If your content is compelling enough, social media can simply be an entry point, teasing the reader with a headline that encourages them to click through to something you’ve posted outside the walled garden of FamousSocialMediaSite.com.

Create a book, eBook, or free download

The same tricks described above also work in reverse: a series of blogs or newsletters that share a common theme can be packaged together to create something bigger you can sell or give away. That’s exactly how I created my eBook The Writer/Designer Dream Team. There’s even a WordPress plug-in called Anthologize specifically designed to capture online content and publish it in print or common eBook formats.

Create a resource library

Even if it’s not the shiniest new thing on your website or blog, content you’ve created remains a valuable asset as long as it’s still beneficial to your clients and prospects. Once it’s had its time in the spotlight, keep it available in an easily-accessible archive. Your website is the best place to keep it around, because the combination of useful information and regular updates is one of the best ways to attract the Internet gremlins that determine search engine rankings.

It’s worthwhile to check in on your archive from time to time. Content that’s technical or tied to current events can become out of date, at which point it may be worthwhile to refresh it (generating new content for your pipeline) or remove it.

Publish on other platforms

A pre-existing “content mine” makes it easy for you to contribute to other websites and publications your buyers read. Some publishers are fine with re-using content in its original form, expanding your audience with a simple cut and paste. Others may ask you to expand or rework your content, either to create something unique or to make it more specific to their readers.

For example, I once wrote a blog for a publisher’s website, something I do at least once a month to build credibility and reach a wider audience. The post caught the attention of a magazine owned by the same company, which paid me to expand it into a longer print article. About six months later I received another check when the article was re-published in two of the company’s anthologies.

Final thoughts

The primary goal of publishing regular content is to increase your visibility, so your options for when and where you reuse it are pretty flexible. Some publishers prefer to let a little time go by before re-publishing content somewhere else, others like to post segments of the same content in multiple channels simultaneously to attract a wider audience. Either strategy is enhanced by an archive that automatically collects older content when it’s replaced by something new.

While all of these strategies offer effective ways to attract new buyers, relevance is still the king. If your content addresses the wants and needs of your readers, any combination of these strategies can be successful. If it doesn’t, none of them will work.

  User manual for technical copy

greengearsMany people I work with have a regular need for technical copy. The industries are as varied as alternative energy, medicine, green construction and IT, but the basic need is always the same: helping bright, inventive people tell their stories without making the reader’s eyes glaze over.

The genie’s out of the bottle, but who’s rubbing the lamp?
Promoting innovative new technologies can be a challenging balancing act, but it basically boils down to two things:

  1. Knowing what your whiz-bang wonder is good for. (Note that this is different from knowing what it does or how it works.)
  2. Knowing your audience.

I like to identify the audience first, but this doesn’t always work with tech because innovation doesn’t like to travel in straight lines. The history of science is filled with stories of clever people who accidentally created a breakthrough product while they were working on something else. Penicillin, Post-it notes, Viagra, Silly Putty, Coca-Cola, chocolate chip cookies, and even the color mauve all share the legacy of being discovered or invented “by mistake.” When this happens, your audience might not be who you originally expected it to be.

New isn’t enough
While there are always early adopters who crave the latest gizmo, there are many more who view new technology with skepticism and dread. Even those who are interested can feel a conflicting pull between the desire to be up to date and the fear of riding the wrong wave of the future.

The key to overcoming these concerns is to be a problem solver. Identify the challenges your technology will ease or eliminate. Will it save time or costs? Reduce the risk of injury? Improve quality? Ensure compliance with regulations?

“Why now” beats “how it works” every time
A critical part of your discovery process will be comparing the costs of using the new technology versus continuing with the status quo. How quickly will users to recoup their costs? If it’s going to take a while, you may need to consider other incentives to encourage buyers to act now. For example, many residential solar companies use a lease-financing payment plan to give their customers immediate cost savings compared to their current electric rates.

The many-headed hydra
If you’re only selling to one group, consider yourself lucky. Tech marketing often creates the need to communicate with people who have different levels of expertise. For example, the engineers who actually use a new software system will want more technical details than the CEO who makes the buying decision. You may also have to consider the needs of journalists and potential investors. When possible, try to direct different marketing efforts with appropriate “geek levels” toward each segment of your audience.

Remember: readers aren’t robots
In the discovery phase, it often takes fifteen minutes or more for brilliant technomancers to explain the significance of their creations. The inevitable PowerPoint accompaniment sometimes helps. Sometimes. (To be fair, this usually isn’t PowerPoint’s fault. For tips on how to cheat “Death by PowerPoint,” check out my colleague Laura Foley.)

Drawn-out explanations like this won’t work outside the lab, so distill the message as much as you can. If you can describe what it does and what it’s good for in ten words or less, you’ll have a major competitive advantage.

  5 reasons you shouldn’t do your own marketing

Just because you do marketing for a living doesn’t mean you have to do your own marketing.

marketing-quandaryA lot of my bread-and-butter work is content marketing for a set of clients that might seem counter-intuitive…other marketing companies.

It’s not as crazy as it sounds. In fact, many businesses I interact with—from solopreneurs to full-scale agencies—are increasingly outsourcing their own promotion. Every month I work with marketing consultants, graphic designers, and even several other writers, all of whom are handing off some portion of their self-promotion to me.

These folks aren’t abdicating their creative voice…they’re very particular about what they “say” when I ghost-write in their voices, and are quick to make changes when needed. Yet many of them tell me month after month how much the collaboration helps them sound “even more like themselves.”

Here are five great reasons why they do it, and why you might consider following their example:

  1. You’re busy. Marketing any organization right takes time, which many agencies don’t have. Rather than overloading your staff with extra tasks—especially if you’re a staff of one—it’s often more efficient and cost-effective to put an outsider on the job.
  2. Promotional writing isn’t where you want to spend your time. Many of my clients are talented designers who hate to write. Great copy helps them look and sound good. Some of the writers I work with are very skilled at their craft but don’t write marketing copy, which is very different from fiction or editorial copy.
  3. You’ll keep your marketing machine on schedule. It’s easy to run a content-focused marketing plan when there’s not much else to do. But when you’ve got deadlines for clients who pay well, the last thing you want to do is take time away from that work to do your own self-promotion. Having someone else handle your marketing schedule keeps everything humming when you get busy, and helps make sure that you stay busy by promoting your services while you focus on paying gigs.
  4. You’ll get an objective perspective. It’s easy to get caught up in your needs and motivations when you write about yourself. An outsider is more likely to think like your prospects and write stuff that takes what they want and need into account.
  5. You won’t have to be shy. Creative people are often afraid that saying great stuff about themselves will be perceived as boasting. Having someone else craft the message that tells the world how great you are short-circuits this inhibition by demonstrating that at least one other person believes the power is in you.

Cheers,

-Tom